Child custody decision spurs woman to abduct her children

On behalf of Gary Kirk of Kirk Montoute LLP posted in Family Law on Wednesday, October 5, 2016.

A divorce can be a messy situation for all those involved. Emotions often run high, tempers can flare, and rash decisions may be the result. A rather exceptional example of such a decision stemmed from a child custody battle that did not go as a woman living outside of Alberta had hoped.

The 44-year-old woman was arrested on June 22, 2016, after allegedly abducting her own children. In April 2016, sole custody of the woman’s two children, a 9-year-old boy and an 11-year-old daughter, was awarded to the children’s father, who is a Winnipeg lawyer. A judge found the mother to be emotionally unstable and permitted her only once-a-week supervised visits with the children. The woman had previously accused the children’s father of sexually abusing their daughter, but these charges were later found to be without merit.

A Canada-wide warrant was issued for her arrest after she purportedly abducted the children and fled in her vehicle. She was found and arrested after five days on the run. Winnipeg Police charged her with one count of fleeing the police and two counts of abduction.

Although this is obviously an unusually extreme reaction to a child custody decision, it nonetheless illustrates the emotional toll a divorce can take on an Alberta resident. Even less desperate actions can get an individual in trouble and may even end up costing custody or visitation rights. The advice and support of a family law firm during a separation may help keep a person on the right path towards achieving his or her custody goals.

Source: winnipegfreepress.com, “No bail for city woman accused of abducting her children, fleeing from police“, Aug. 10, 2016

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